The Link Between Menopause and Pelvic Organ Prolapse

As you get older and hit menopause, your body produces less estrogen. This decrease in estrogen can lead to pelvic organ prolapse, a condition in which one of your pelvic organs moves or falls out of place.

Khashayar Shakiba, MD, at Women’s Pelvic Surgery of North Jersey in Hackensack, New Jersey, is an expert in pelvic medicine and surgery. In this blog, he discusses what pelvic organ prolapse is and how it can be prevented or treated.

What is pelvic organ prolapse?

Your pelvic organs include your uterus, bladder, vagina, urethra, small bowel, and rectum. A pelvic organ prolapse is when one of these weakens or drops out of place. This can happen, because as you grow older and estrogen decreases, the connective tissue that supports these organs can weaken. 

When these connective tissues stretch or get damaged, whatever organ they’re supporting can slip out of place. Sometimes the organ can even protrude out of the vaginal opening. 

Symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse can become more likely as you age. Some of the symptoms can include:

Treating and preventing pelvic organ prolapse

There are a number of ways to treat and prevent pelvic organ prolapse. Here are a few of them. 

Hormone replacement therapy

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is sometimes recommended to help reduce the risk of pelvic organ prolapse. Estrogen production decreases during menopause. However, HRT can increase your body’s estrogen and help prevent the thinning of connective tissue.

Colpocleisis

Colpocleisis is a surgery in which Dr. Shakiba shortens your vaginal canal to give your uterus more support. For this surgery, he uses the state-of-the-art da Vinci® system. This minimally invasive system makes tiny incisions, which can help you heal quicker.

Sacrocolpopexy

Sacrocolpopexy is another surgical procedure Dr. Shakiba performs with the da Vinci® system. A screen-like material is inserted into your body to reinforce weakened tissues and organs. 

Pessary

If you need temporary relief before scheduling surgery, Dr. Shakiba can give you a pessary This small, rubber device, which is inserted into your vagina, helps hold the uterus in place. It requires frequent checkups.

If you’re concerned about your pelvic health, book an appointment online or over the phone with Women’s Pelvic Surgery of North Jersey today.

You Might Also Enjoy...

What Most People Don't Know About Endometriosis

Think you know endometriosis? Most people are aware of the pain and potential fertility problems, but some other facts might surprise you. Keep reading to find out the good, the bad, and the ugly about this condition.

Life After a Hysterectomy

Whether you have fibroids, endometriosis, chronic pain, or even cancer, a hysterectomy can eliminate all related symptoms. But life without your uterus brings on some other life changes as well. Find out what to expect.

Do Ovarian Cysts Impact Fertility?

Ovarian cysts are pretty common, and they’re usually nothing to worry about. But once in a while, they cause complications — could they stop you from having a baby? Find out here.

The Different Types of Incontinence

There are self-help books for those who lose control of their temper, their dog, or their kids, but if you lose control of your urine, you need medical help. There are five types of urinary incontinence, and there’s quick and easy help for each.

Reasons Why Your Pelvic Floor Is So Important

You know your pelvic region is “down there” somewhere, but what does it include, and what does it do? More importantly, what can go wrong? Keep reading to find out all you need to know about the base of your pelvis.

When to Consider a Hysterectomy

If you’re dealing with chronic pain, excessive bleeding, or a serious disease, it may be best to remove the problem surgically. If the issue is in your uterus, a hysterectomy may be in order. Here are the most common reasons for the procedure.